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Plympton-Wyoming Appreciation Awards draw crowd

By Melissa Schilz, Postmedia Network

Tony Uzonyi was one of several community members honoured Saturday – the Wyoming Station firefighter helped to save a woman’s life last year after she suffered a heart attack at the Camlachie Community Hall. (Melissa Schilz/Postmedia Network)

Tony Uzonyi was one of several community members honoured Saturday – the Wyoming Station firefighter helped to save a woman’s life last year after she suffered a heart attack at the Camlachie Community Hall. (Melissa Schilz/Postmedia Network)

 Plympton-Wyoming Mayor Lonny Napper held his annual community luncheon Saturday, and he’s hopeful it won’t be the last. Napper announced after the awards ceremony that he has plans to run again in the race for the municipality’s top job.

 

“I’ll be the first one in line to put my name down,” he said to the crowd.

 

Napper, who was first elected to council in 1988, was the mayor of Plympton before amalgamation. In 2006 he became mayor of Plympton-Wyoming, a job that he says has treated him well over the years.

 

The politician has a sense of humour, giving his audience a few good laughs at Saturday’s luncheon. Napper said while his jokes can sometimes get him into hot water, he wants to put others at ease, reminding people to not take themselves too seriously.

 

“Don’t sweat the small stuff,” he said.

 

Napper said he’s not ready to leave politics just yet; he’s passionate about his community and said he enjoys every minute of it.

 

“I’ve still got some fire left in me, there’s things I want to do,” he said. “I just enjoy it.”

 

Napper’s awards ceremony saw a number of community members recognized for their hard work, including local egg farmers, Lambton Elderly Outreach, the Lady Luck Motorcycle Club and local teacher Alison Feniak, who was named Energy Educator of the Year in 2017. The event raised over $1600 for South Plympton Public School's farewell ceremony, set to be held this April.

 

Napper said he’s always impressed to see what his neighbours are doing to make a difference, and taking the time to recognize their work is important. He said he sets aside a portion of his own money each year to pay for the community event.

 

“The town has been so good to me,” he said. “It’s a lot of people that normally don’t get recognized, and everyone is worthy of it.”